Looks Like a Bruise but Not a Bruise

Looks Like a Bruise but Not a Bruise

VERY IMPORTANT!!

 Misunderstandings 

  • I GET BRUISES WHEN I DO CUPPING: Cupping patients will be the first to tell you.  It is not a bruise.   It looks like a bruise but it doesn't feel like a bruise.  Cupping marks as we call them "Cupping Kisses" are the physical outcome of pathogens, toxins, blockages and impurities (waste products) that are an undesirable presence in the body. 

The following information is from "A cupping Mark is not a bruise" by Bruce Bentley. You can read the entire essay on the scholarly tab located on the Member's Area Page.

  • Cupping marks that display a fresh red colour indicate a recent traumatic injury with accompanying heat. n Black, deep purple or deep blue indicates blood stagnation
  • Black, deep purple or deep blue indicates blood stagnation (Pic 1). It occurs when an injury or illness (including strong coldness inducing blood stasis) has resided in the body for a long time. A robust exogenous pathogenic agent such as the combination of wind with cold can also quickly manifest as a dark mark. It is telling that many massage therapists who receive cupping for the first time to the margins between the three deltoid heads frequently display dark marks. This indicates that the shoulder girdle has become congested due to over-use. It is recommended that MTs get cupping to these spaces on a monthly basis to keep the region in good order.
  • A light pink or pale blue mark indicates mild coldness.
  • A pale or white mark that fades quickly indicates a lack of energy and function
  • A mottled presentation comprising crimson (or red) and white or lighter elements represents the condition where deficient body energy (whiteness) impedes the blood circulation (redness).
  • A pale or white mark that fades quickly indicates a lack of energy and function
  • Red dotting indicates the presence of a heat toxin due to blockage causing pent-up heat, which the Chinese call sha (Bentley, 2011). These small bright-red dots also commonly result from sliding cupping, which due to its constant state of motion tends to draw from more superficial levels compared to stationary cups, which draw from the full entitlement of depth possible. Even when slowly sliding silicone-cupping vessels to rectify the fascia using the modern cupping technique, the innate mechanism of drawing outwards will It is telling that many massage therapists who receive cupping for the first time to the margins between the three deltoid heads frequently display dark marks. ” Vol: 12-2 feature 18 sometimes inevitably cause certain factors lying within the underlying tissue to emerge at the surface. Sha made apparent by cupping typically resolves in a short period of time.

Six reasons why a cupping mark is not a bruise The list below is a brief summary of some of the critical differences between a cupping mark and a bruise. By Bruce Bentley

On many occasions cupping produces no marking, even when a robust volume of negative pressure (vacuum) is within the cup, because pathogens and other unwanted factors are not there to be drawn to the surface

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By definition, a bruise occurs “as a result of a blow that does not break the skin” (Lackie, 2010), or otherwise, “bleeding in soft tissue resulting from a direct blow with a blunt instrument” (Kent, 2007). The lifting suction effect of a cupping vessel on the skin stands in stark contrast to the inward sinking dynamic of a blow to the surface. Furthermore, there is no trauma caused by the solid rim of a cup

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“A bruise changes colour, first to blue as a red pigment of haemoglobin loses its oxygen, and then to brown or yellow as the haemoglobin is broken down and reabsorbed”(Kent, 2007). This description of a bruise’s colour changes does not apply to the fading and resolution of a cupping mark. The fading of a cupping mark is a progressive lessening of the original hue Vol: 12-2 feature 20 without any different colour transitions.

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“A bruise changes colour, first to blue as a red pigment of haemoglobin loses its oxygen, and then to brown or yellow as the haemoglobin is broken down and reabsorbed”(Kent, 2007). This description of a bruise’s colour changes does not apply to the fading and resolution of a cupping mark. The fading of a cupping mark is a progressive lessening of the original hue Vol: 12-2 feature 20 without any different colour transitions.

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When we have a bruise, experience tells us that it is tender to touch (due to trauma). After cupping there is no such accompanying tenderness. Note: Only following over zealous and aggressive cupping can a bruise-associated yellow stain be produced, together with tenderness within and beyond the periphery of a cupping mark. Such a sign represents poor practice

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Imagine a cup has been applied and produces a strong dark mark. After that has resolved and another cup is reapplied on the identical location, with the same suction level and for the same duration, the marking is typically only about half as ‘ferocious’ as the first time. By the third session, chances are the response will only be a faint showing. Usually by the fourth treatment no marking occurs. This is clearly a case of an internal pathogen or toxin being systematically resolved. This scenario would be the opposite if it were a bruise. The capillary damage incurred by a trauma to produce a bruise would increase with repeated assaults. The following is a further illustration. Picture two round cupping marks side by side, with a gap of 2-3 cm between each at the closest point. When they have faded to half their original form, apply a single cup over that gap with the same level of suction. Strong marking will be produced only in the previously un-cupped space between them. The hue formed in the margins of the former cups will a considerably lesser shade. This clearly indicates that the pathogen has been resolved to a significant extent within the range of the first two cups, compared to the “in-between” tissue that was unaffected by the first application.

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A bruise can be successfully cleared using cupping. Healing a large bruise for example, can be accelerated by applying a soft to moderate strength cup to the centre of the bruise and sliding it outwards beyond the bruise’s perimeter. Complete the treatment by repeating the above along successive margins as if following the spokes of an imaginary wheel. A bruise is after all a form of blood stagnation and cupping is excellent at dispersing blood stagnation.